Is Big Baby An Oxymoron?

What is the paradox?

A paradox, also known as an antinomy, is a logically self-contradictory statement or a statement that runs contrary to one’s expectation.

It is a statement that, despite apparently valid reasoning from true premises, leads to a seemingly self-contradictory or a logically unacceptable conclusion..

What’s the opposite of oxymoron?

tautologyNotes: A tautology is the opposite of an oxymoron, two words that contradict each other, such as the living dead. The words of a tautology mean the same thing: a dead corpse is a tautology because corpse itself means “dead”.

What is oxymoron give 5 examples?

Suddenly the room filled with a deafening silence. The comedian was seriously funny. You are clearly confused by the situation you have found yourself in. Her singing was enough to raise the living dead.

Can a person be an oxymoron?

People aren’t called “oxymoron”. … You don’t call someone an oxymoron; it’s not a personal characteristic; it’s a figure of speech (or writing). You might say “deafening silence” or “oddly normal” or “jumbo shrimp” are oxymorons, because they appear to be contradictory but in fact they make an intriguing kind of sense.

Is sweet pain an oxymoron?

An example might help: the oxymoron “sweet sorrow” speaks to the paradox that love and pain can go together, but the oxymoron is not, in and of itself, the paradox that it expresses.

What is a good oxymoron?

Common OxymoronsAct naturally.Alone together.Amazingly awful.Bittersweet.Clearly confused.Dark light.Deafening silence.Definitely maybe.More items…

Is larger half a oxymoron?

Bigger half. To say that one half is bigger than another is an oxymoron because it means that they can’t be halves. What’s meant is something like “the bigger of what ought to be, or was intended to be, two equal pieces.”

Is free gift an oxymoron?

“There is no such thing as free lunch.” To this, Mauss would add ‘free gift’ For him, free gift is an oxymoron. A gift comes with three obligations: to give, to receive, and to reciprocate. A person must give, and the other must receive, and give back something of equal, if not greater, value.

What is it called when a phrase contradicts itself?

A paradox is a statement that contradicts itself, or that must be both true and untrue at the same time. Paradoxes are quirks in logic that demonstrate how our thinking sometimes goes haywire, even when we use perfectly logical reasoning to get there.

What is an example of an oxymoron?

An oxymoron is a self-contradicting word or group of words (as in Shakespeare’s line from Romeo and Juliet, “Why, then, O brawling love! O loving hate!”). A paradox is a statement or argument that seems to be contradictory or to go against common sense, but that is yet perhaps still true—for example, “less is more.”

Is bad luck an oxymoron?

is “bad luck” an oxymoron? it’s not an oxymoron it’s just the only kind i ever have. Luck in no way means that it is specifically good. Even when something bad happens, people will say, “Just my luck.”

Is upside down an oxymoron?

Upside Down Although this oxymoron may not be entirely incorrect, it still has contradicting meanings. When something is facing upwards, then how is it down? It’s just funny that we use the word “upside” to represent something that is turned.

Is loud silence an oxymoron?

The most common type of oxymoron is an adjective followed by a noun. One oxymoron example is “deafening silence,” which describes a silence that is so overpowering it almost feels deafening, or extremely loud—just as an actual sound would.

What’s the difference between irony and oxymoron?

is that oxymoron is oxymoron (figure of speech) while irony is a statement that, when taken in context, may actually mean something different from, or the opposite of, what is written literally; the use of words expressing something other than their literal intention, often in a humorous context.

Is an oxymoron an oxymoron?

An oxymoron (usual plural oxymorons, more rarely oxymora) is a rhetorical device that uses an ostensible self-contradiction to illustrate a rhetorical point or to reveal a paradox. A more general meaning of “contradiction in terms” (not necessarily for rhetoric effect) is recorded by the OED for 1902.